Calendar with removable pins. (Saturn, Sun, Luna, Mars, Mercury, Jupiter, Venus).
From the stone plate of the 3rd—4th centuries CE, found in Rome. Rome, Museum of Roman Civilization

Calendar with removable pins. (Saturn, Sun, Luna, Mars, Mercury, Jupiter, Venus).

From the stone plate of the 3rd—4th centuries CE, found in Rome.

Rome, Museum of Roman Civilization
(Museo della civiltà romana)

Description:
Calendar with removable pins similar to our “everlasting” calendar was in use in the late antiquity. The first pin designated the day of week: it was inserted into the hole under the image of the god-protector of the day (the row begins with Saturn, from left to right, see the picture; Sun, Luna, Mars, Mercury, Jupiter, Venus following next). The second pin served as the designation of the month: it was inserted into that sector of the circle where the zodiacal symbol corresponding to the month was depicted; and the third pin to the left and to the right of the vertical columns indicated the day of the month. It was customary to begin the row of planets with Saturn because it was considered the most remote planet from the Earth (of the planets then known) with the longest time of orbiting.
Credits:
© Image, text: Slovar’ antichnosti. / Per. s nem. — M.: Progress, 1989 (to article “Kalendar’”)
Keywords: plaster cast calco calendar with removable pins pin stone plate signs of the zodiac saturn cronus kronos sun helios luna mars hermes mercury mercurius jupiter iupiter juppiter iuppiter jovis iovis jove giove zeus aphrodite afrodite venus venere kerykeion caduceus sickle thunderbolt
History of Ancient Rome