A lenos-shaped sarcophagus with a myth of Selene and Endymion.

Marble. Early 3rd cent. CE.
Inv. No. 47.100.4a, b.

New York, the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Origin:
The sarcophagus, which is in excellent condition, was intact when recovered from a chamber tomb in Ostia in 1825. It was believed to have burned in a fire at Warwick Castle in 1871; Carl Robert included it in his corpus as a lost work known only from old engravings. The sarcophagus appeared on the art market in London in 1913 and entered the Museum’s collection in 1947.

J. Sorabella
Literature:
Sorabella, Jean. 2001. “A Roman Sarcophagus and its Patron.” Metropolitan Museum Journal 36: pp. 67-79.
Matz, Friedrich. 1957. “An Endymion Sarcophagus Rediscovered.” The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin 15(5): pp. 124-128.
Credits:
© 2013. Photo: Ilya Shurygin.
© 2001. Text: Sorabella J. 2001. «A Roman Sarcophagus and its Patron». Metropolitan Museum Journal 36, p. 67.

comment
THE GALLERY OF ANCIENT ART
Keywords: sarcophagus sarkophag sarcofago lenos marble relief myth of Selene and Endymion Endimione The sleep of Endymion Hesperus Phosphorus Eros Amor Cupid Tellus Selene Hypnos Helios Phoebus shepherd pastore sheep ram ewe sheeps dog horse horses harness gear chariot cornucopia Zodiac Arria Aninia Hilara Inv No 47 100 4a 4b
HISTORY OF ANCIENT ROME