Apollo Belvedere.

Marble. Roman copy (c. 130—140 CE) in marble of a Greek bronze (c. 330—320 BCE), probably by Leochares.
Inv. No. 1015.

Rome, Vatican Museums, Pius-Clementine Museum, Octagonal Court, Apollo Cabinet, 2
(Musei Vaticani, Museo Pio-Clementino)

Description:
CABINET OF THE APOLLO

The Apollo Belvedere, a Roman copy (c. 130—140 A.D.) in marble of a Greek bronze (c. 330—320 B.C.), probably by Leochares, which once stood in the Agora of Athens (Pausanias, 1, 3, 4). Julius II brought this statue, which was known as far back as the 14th century, from his palace near San Pietro in Vincoli to the Belvedere Court of the Statues. The hands, removed in 1924, were made by Giovanni Angelo da Montorsoli in 1532. The god, “he who strikes from afar”, held a bow in his left hand, as a symbol of his role as avenger. In his right hand he presumably held an arrow, taken from his open quiver. The cloak draped over his shoulders and left arm emphasizes his radiant, youthful figure, the maximum expression of the nobility and purity of the Apollonian being. “Thus the gods dispose that poor mortals must live in anguish, but they themselves are not touched by pain”, writes Homer (Illiad 6, 138 and 24, 525). Hölderlin remarked of this statue, “...the eyes observe with silent, eternal light”. Johann Joachim Winckelmann wrote, “Of all the works of antiquity that have escaped destruction, the statue of Apollo represents the highest ideal of art”.

Credits:
© 2005. Photo: S. Sosnovskiy.
© 1986 Text: Guide to the Vatican: Museums and City. Pontifical Monuments, Museums and Galleries. Tipografia Vaticana, p. 41.
RUSSIAN

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THE DATABASE OF ANCIENT ART
Keywords: marble statue of Apollo Belvedere Phoebus by the sculptor Leochares bow quiver Inv No 1015 APO 2
HISTORY OF ANCIENT ROME