ANCIENT ART
MYTHOLOGY IN THE ART | Greek mythology | Priapus
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1. SCULPTURE. Rome.
Male bust (Dionysos? Plato? Dionysos-Plato? Priapus?).
Bronze. 49—25 BCE.
H. 50 cm.
Inv. No. 5618.
Naples, National Archaeological Museum.
2. SCULPTURE. Rome.
Male bust (Dionysos? Plato? Dionysos-Plato? Priapus?).
Bronze. 49—25 BCE.
Inv. No. 5618.
Naples, National Archaeological Museum.
3. SCULPTURE. Rome.
Sarcophagus with scenes of bacchanalia (close-up).
White marble. 140—160 CE.
Inv. No. 27710.
Naples, National Archaeological Museum.
4. SCULPTURE. Rome.
Sarcophagus with scenes of bacchanalia.
White marble. 140—160 CE.
204 × 510 × 66 cm.
Inv. No. 27710.
Naples, National Archaeological Museum.
5. SCULPTURE. Rome.
A sarcophagus of a child with vintage scenes.
Luni (Carrara) marble. 2nd century CE.
Rome, National Museum of Palazzo Venezia.
6. SCULPTURE. Greece.
Decorative vase “Dionysus and his companions”. Detail: herm of Priapus.
Marble. 2nd century CE.
Inv. No. A 111.
Saint Petersburg, The State Hermitage Museum.
7. GLYPTICS. Egypt.
Sacrifice to Priapos.
Sardonyx. 1st century BCE.
1.7 × 2.7 cm.
Inv. No Ć 281.
Saint Petersburg, The State Hermitage Museum.
8. GLYPTICS. Egypt.
Sacrifice to Priapos.
Sardonyx. Alexandria. 1st century BCE.
2.7 × 1.8 cm.
Saint Petersburg, The State Hermitage Museum.
9. SCULPTURE. Rome.
Dancing maenad. Oscillum.
Marble. Late 1st century CE.
Inv. No. I 38.
Vienna, Museum of Art History.
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