THE GALLERY OF ANCIENT ART

Mythology in the Art | Greek mythology | Zeus
61. PAINTING, GRAPHICS. Rome.
Young Heracles strangles the snakes.
Fresco of the Fourth style. 60—79 CE.
Pompeii, Archaeological Park, House of the Vettii (VI. 15. 1. n).
62. PAINTING, GRAPHICS. Rome.
Hercules strangling the snakes before the eyes of Amphitryon and Alcmene. Fragment.
Fresco of the Fourth style. 60—79 CE.
Pompeii, Archaeological Park, House of the Vettii (VI. 15. 1. n).
63. SCULPTURE. Rome.
Head of Zeus-Serapis.
White marble.
End of the 2nd cent. CE.
Inv. No. 384.
Ravenna, National Museum.
64. SCULPTURE. Rome.
Head of Zeus.
Marble. Roman copy after a Greek original of the late 5th century BCE.
Height 38 cm.
Inv. No. 3310.
Rome, Capitoline Museums.
65. SCULPTURE. Rome.
Trojan slab (Tabula Iliaca).
Calcite.
1st century BCE.
Inv. No. 316.
Rome, Capitoline Museums, Palazzo Nuovo, Hall of the Doves.
66. SCULPTURE. Rome.
Trojan slab (Tabula Iliaca).
Calcite.
1st century BCE.
Inv. No. 316.
Rome, Capitoline Museums, Palazzo Nuovo, Hall of the Doves.
67. SCULPTURE. Rome.
Sarcophagus of a child with scenes of the myth of Prometheus and the creation of man.
Marble. 3rd cent. CE.
Inv. No. S 329.
Rome, Capitoline Museums, Palazzo Nuovo, Hall of the Doves.
68. SCULPTURE. Rome.
Sarcophagus of a child with scenes of the myth of Prometheus and the creation of man (the front panel).
Marble. 3rd cent. CE.
Inv. No. S 329.
Rome, Capitoline Museums, Palazzo Nuovo, Hall of the Doves.
69. SCULPTURE. Rome.
Rear of columnar sarcophagus showing the Labours of Heracles and scenes of hunt. Frieze of a sarcophagus lid showing the presentation of Apollo and Artemis to Zeus. Acroteria.
Rear wall: asiatic marble. 160 CE.
Lid: Italian marble. Ca. 150 CE.
Inv. Nos. 95 (wall) / 96 (lid).
Rome, Museum and Gallery of Villa Borghese, Room II.
70. SCULPTURE. Rome.
Frieze of a sarcophagus lid showing the presentation of Apollo and Artemis to Zeus.
Lid: Italian marble. 2nd cent. CE.
Inv. No. 96.
Rome, Museum and Gallery of Villa Borghese, Room II.
71. SCULPTURE. Rome.
Front wall of sarcophagus with clipeus portrait (imago clipeata) of the deceased boy.
Luni (Carrara) marble. 3rd century CE.
Rome, National Museum of Palazzo Venezia.
72. SCULPTURE. Rome.
Jupiter with the aegis.
Parian marble.
2nd—3rd cent. CE.
Inv. No. 324751.
Rome, Roman National Museum, Baths of Diocletian, Small Cloister of the Certosa.
73. SCULPTURE. Rome.
Jupiter with the aegis.
Parian marble.
2nd—3rd cent. CE.
Inv. No. 324751.
Rome, Roman National Museum, Baths of Diocletian, Small Cloister of the Certosa.
74. SCULPTURE. Rome.
Jupiter with the aegis.
Parian marble.
2nd—3rd cent. CE.
Inv. No. 324751.
Rome, Roman National Museum, Baths of Diocletian, Small Cloister of the Certosa.
75. SCULPTURE. Rome.
Jupiter with the aegis.
Parian marble.
2nd—3rd cent. CE.
Inv. No. 324751.
Rome, Roman National Museum, Baths of Diocletian, Small Cloister of the Certosa.
76. SCULPTURE. Rome.
Jupiter with the aegis.
Parian marble.
2nd—3rd cent. CE.
Inv. No. 324751.
Rome, Roman National Museum, Baths of Diocletian, Small Cloister of the Certosa.
77. SCULPTURE. Rome.
Zeus.
Marble. Roman copy of the first half of 2nd century CE after a Greek original of late 5th — early 4th century BCE.
Inv. No. 8635.
Rome, Roman National Museum, Palazzo Altemps.
78. CERAMICS. Southern Italy.
Fliacic scene: Zeus in love adventure under the window of Alcmene, assisted by Hermes.
Red-figured bell-krater (side A). Paestum.
Ca. 350—340 BCE.
Attributed to the Painter Asteas.
Inv. No. 17106.
Rome, Vatican Museums, Gregorian Etruscan Museum.
79. SCULPTURE. Rome.
Seated statue of Jupiter (so-called Jupiter Verospi).
Marble.
Dating: 80—100 CE (Spinola) / 3rd cent. CE (others scholars).
Only the upper part of the body is ancient, up to the legs; the arms, some parts of the face and of the hair and the rest of the body were integrated in the 18th century.
Inv. No. 671.
Rome, Vatican Museums, Pius-Clementine Museum, Gallery of the Busts, 77.
80. SCULPTURE. Rome.
Seated statue of Jupiter (so-called Jupiter Verospi).
Marble.
Dating: 80—100 CE (Spinola) / 3rd cent. CE (others scholars).
Only the upper part of the body is ancient, up to the legs; the arms, some parts of the face and of the hair and the rest of the body were integrated in the 18th century.
Inv. No. 671.
Rome, Vatican Museums, Pius-Clementine Museum, Gallery of the Busts, 77.